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cd-hit

About

CD-HIT - Cluster Database at High Identity with Tolerance.

CD-HIT takes a fasta format sequence database as input and produces a set of 'non-redundant' (nr) representative sequences as output. In addition cd-hit outputs a cluster file, documenting the sequence 'groupies' for each nr sequence representative. The idea is to reduce the overall size of the database without removing any sequence information by only removing 'redundant' (or highly similar) sequences. This is why the resulting database is called non-redundant (nr). Essentially, cd-hit produces a set of closely related protein families from a given fasta sequence database.

CD-HIT uses a 'longest sequence first' list removal algorithm to remove sequences above a certain identity threshold. Additionally the algorithm implements a very fast heuristic to find high identity segments between sequences, and so can avoid many costly full alignments.

Versions and Availability

Module Names for cd-hit on philip
Machine Version Module Name
philip 4.6.1 cd-hit/4.6.1/INTEL-15.0.3
▶ Module FAQ?

The information here is applicable to LSU HPC and LONI systems.

Shells

A user may choose between using /bin/bash and /bin/tcsh. Details about each shell follows.

/bin/bash

System resource file: /etc/profile

When one access the shell, the following user files are read in if they exist (in order):

  1. ~/.bash_profile (anything sent to STDOUT or STDERR will cause things like rsync to break)
  2. ~/.bashrc (interactive login only)
  3. ~/.profile

When a user logs out of an interactive session, the file ~/.bash_logout is executed if it exists.

The default value of the environmental variable, PATH, is set automatically using SoftEnv. See below for more information.

/bin/tcsh

The file ~/.cshrc is used to customize the user's environment if his login shell is /bin/tcsh.

Modules

Modules is a utility which helps users manage the complex business of setting up their shell environment in the face of potentially conflicting application versions and libraries.

Default Setup

When a user logs in, the system looks for a file named .modules in their home directory. This file contains module commands to set up the initial shell environment.

Viewing Available Modules

The command

$ module avail

displays a list of all the modules available. The list will look something like:

--- some stuff deleted ---
velvet/1.2.10/INTEL-14.0.2
vmatch/2.2.2

---------------- /usr/local/packages/Modules/modulefiles/admin -----------------
EasyBuild/1.11.1       GCC/4.9.0              INTEL-140-MPICH/3.1.1
EasyBuild/1.13.0       INTEL/14.0.2           INTEL-140-MVAPICH2/2.0
--- some stuff deleted ---

The module names take the form appname/version/compiler, providing the application name, the version, and information about how it was compiled (if needed).

Managing Modules

Besides avail, there are other basic module commands to use for manipulating the environment. These include:

add/load mod1 mod2 ... modn . . . Add modules
rm/unload mod1 mod2 ... modn  . . Remove modules
switch/swap mod . . . . . . . . . Switch or swap one module for another
display/show  . . . . . . . . . . List modules loaded in the environment
avail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . List available module names
whatis mod1 mod2 ... modn . . . . Describe listed modules

The -h option to module will list all available commands.

Module is currently available only on SuperMIC.

Resources

Last modified: October 09 2015 08:15:58.